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    What does military rule mean again?
1. It means thievery
2. It means the word against the gun [no freedom of speech]
3. It means the revolutionaries/activists are thugs 
Graffito on the wall encircling the American University in Cairo’s downtown campus on Mohammed Mahmoud Street. It is one of a series of paintings/murals that are currently on the wall. 

    What does military rule mean again?

    1. It means thievery

    2. It means the word against the gun [no freedom of speech]

    3. It means the revolutionaries/activists are thugs 

    Graffito on the wall encircling the American University in Cairo’s downtown campus on Mohammed Mahmoud Street. It is one of a series of paintings/murals that are currently on the wall. 

     
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    Your gas lights Israel
Go down (to the street)!
Graffito on Taha Hussein Street in Zamalek. 
Israel receives almost 45% of its gas from Egypt; Egypt exports about 1.7 billion cubic meters of gas to southern Israel per year according to a 20-year contract signed in 2005 between Israel and the Egyptian-Israeli company East Mediterranean Gas (EMG).
Yet by 2008, when gas started flowing to Israel, the price of gas agreed upon in the contract was three times lower than international prices. Israel continues to receive gas from Egypt at below market prices. 
Angered by the alleged corruption surrounding the deal, many Egyptians have called for authorities to stop gas flow to Israel. Since the uprising in Egypt began last year, the pipeline between Egypt and Israel in the Sinai has come under attack almost a dozen times. 
An article from The National: "Corruption inquiry focus on Egyptian gas contract:"
"Egyptian gas supplies to Israel have become the focus of a wide-ranging corruption investigation into the dealings of Hosni Mubarak, the former Egyptian president, and key associates.
"The Egyptian public prosecutor this week ordered Mr Mubarak to be detained for a further 15 days to allow time for him to be questioned about a controversial contract to export gas to Israel.
"The prosecutor alleges the deal has cost Egypt more than US$714 million (Dh2.62 billion) in lost revenue, and the future of the exports is now in doubt.
"Sameh Fahmy, the former Egyptian oil minister, and five other former energy officials are in custody pending an investigation of the deal.
"They have been charged with "hurting the country’s interest, squandering public money and enabling others to make financial gains" by exporting gas to Israel below the market price and based on "unfair contractual conditions", said the office of the prosecutor general.
"Under a 20-year contract signed in 2005 between the Israeli-Egyptian company East Mediterranean Gas (EMG) and Israel, up to 1.7 billion cubic metres a year of Egyptian gas was to be delivered by pipeline to southern Israel at a maximum price for the first 15 years of $1.25 per million British thermal units (btu).
"But by the time the gas started flowing in 2008, international prices were at least three times higher. The direct cost of exporting the gas had risen to an estimated $2.56 per million btu.
"In early 2009, an Egyptian court ordered the exports halted, but it was overruled by a higher court. Last year, EMG signed a new contract valued at $19bn, boosting the exports to 6 million cubic metres a year or about 40 per cent of Israel’s total gas demand.
"The prosecution’s case hinges on allegations the Egyptian government sold gas to EMG at below market price, with key government figures, including Mr Mubarak, receiving kickbacks.
"The former president and his energy minister are reported to have each testified that the other was responsible for the deal.
"The gas dispute is a political touchstone that Israel fears will be used to overturn the 1979 peace treaty between it and Egypt. The accord signed by Mr Mubarak’s predecessor, Anwar Sadat, was from the outset deeply resented by many Egyptians Mr Sadat was assassinated in 1981.
"EMG’s major shareholders include the Israeli investment firm Ampal-American Israel and the Egyptian businessman Hussein Salem, a close friend of Mr Mubarak.
"Mr Salem is believed to have fled to Saudi Arabia on January 26, the day after the protests began. On Sunday, three tonnes of valuables reported to belong to the businessman were confiscated at Cairo airport, from where they were allegedly being smuggled to Jeddah.
"The 100 intercepted parcels contained paintings, antiques and carpets, including one bearing Mr Salem’s name, expensive watches, gold statues and items that may be subject to Egypt’s antiquities protection law."

    Your gas lights Israel

    Go down (to the street)!

    Graffito on Taha Hussein Street in Zamalek. 

    Israel receives almost 45% of its gas from Egypt; Egypt exports about 1.7 billion cubic meters of gas to southern Israel per year according to a 20-year contract signed in 2005 between Israel and the Egyptian-Israeli company East Mediterranean Gas (EMG).

    Yet by 2008, when gas started flowing to Israel, the price of gas agreed upon in the contract was three times lower than international prices. Israel continues to receive gas from Egypt at below market prices. 

    Angered by the alleged corruption surrounding the deal, many Egyptians have called for authorities to stop gas flow to Israel. Since the uprising in Egypt began last year, the pipeline between Egypt and Israel in the Sinai has come under attack almost a dozen times. 

    An article from The National: "Corruption inquiry focus on Egyptian gas contract:"

    "Egyptian gas supplies to Israel have become the focus of a wide-ranging corruption investigation into the dealings of Hosni Mubarak, the former Egyptian president, and key associates.

    "The Egyptian public prosecutor this week ordered Mr Mubarak to be detained for a further 15 days to allow time for him to be questioned about a controversial contract to export gas to Israel.

    "The prosecutor alleges the deal has cost Egypt more than US$714 million (Dh2.62 billion) in lost revenue, and the future of the exports is now in doubt.

    "Sameh Fahmy, the former Egyptian oil minister, and five other former energy officials are in custody pending an investigation of the deal.

    "They have been charged with "hurting the country’s interest, squandering public money and enabling others to make financial gains" by exporting gas to Israel below the market price and based on "unfair contractual conditions", said the office of the prosecutor general.

    "Under a 20-year contract signed in 2005 between the Israeli-Egyptian company East Mediterranean Gas (EMG) and Israel, up to 1.7 billion cubic metres a year of Egyptian gas was to be delivered by pipeline to southern Israel at a maximum price for the first 15 years of $1.25 per million British thermal units (btu).

    "But by the time the gas started flowing in 2008, international prices were at least three times higher. The direct cost of exporting the gas had risen to an estimated $2.56 per million btu.

    "In early 2009, an Egyptian court ordered the exports halted, but it was overruled by a higher court. Last year, EMG signed a new contract valued at $19bn, boosting the exports to 6 million cubic metres a year or about 40 per cent of Israel’s total gas demand.

    "The prosecution’s case hinges on allegations the Egyptian government sold gas to EMG at below market price, with key government figures, including Mr Mubarak, receiving kickbacks.

    "The former president and his energy minister are reported to have each testified that the other was responsible for the deal.

    "The gas dispute is a political touchstone that Israel fears will be used to overturn the 1979 peace treaty between it and Egypt. The accord signed by Mr Mubarak’s predecessor, Anwar Sadat, was from the outset deeply resented by many Egyptians Mr Sadat was assassinated in 1981.

    "EMG’s major shareholders include the Israeli investment firm Ampal-American Israel and the Egyptian businessman Hussein Salem, a close friend of Mr Mubarak.

    "Mr Salem is believed to have fled to Saudi Arabia on January 26, the day after the protests began. On Sunday, three tonnes of valuables reported to belong to the businessman were confiscated at Cairo airport, from where they were allegedly being smuggled to Jeddah.

    "The 100 intercepted parcels contained paintings, antiques and carpets, including one bearing Mr Salem’s name, expensive watches, gold statues and items that may be subject to Egypt’s antiquities protection law."

     
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    The wall on Al-Sheikh Rehan and Qasr Al-Aini Streets in downtown Cairo. It was built on December 19, 2011 and serves to block access to Interior Ministry and the Central Security Forces buildings. 

    The wall on Al-Sheikh Rehan and Qasr Al-Aini Streets in downtown Cairo. It was built on December 19, 2011 and serves to block access to Interior Ministry and the Central Security Forces buildings. 

     
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    You pretend to be paralyzed 
 You pretend to be crazy 
 Execution, execution by the law 
Roughly translated phrase on a wall on Mohammed Mahmoud Street near the American University in Cairo’s Tahrir Square campus in downtown Cairo. The author of the phrase is referring to former president Hosni Mubarak, who has been in the hospital since April 2011 (and thus for the entirety of his trial).
Media coverage of the trial has shown an ashen-faced, ailing Mubarak lying on a stretcher in a cage in the courtroom.   Below is an article from the Egypt Independent about the most recent developments in the trial of Mubarak and several former members of his regime:

 "Court to rule in Mubarak trial on 2 June, but defendants can appeal:" 
The Mubarak trial was supposed to be a historic moment when a dictator was brought to justice by his long-suffering people, but it has been widely criticized as little more than political theater.
The prosecution is asking for the death sentence for Mubarak, usually carried out by hanging in Egypt. Mubarak’s defense team argued that he is still president, and thus can only be tried for treason or in a special court. Mubarak can appeal the verdict if he is found guilty.
Judge Ahmed Refaat announced Wednesday that a verdict would be delivered on 2 June.
Former President Mubarak, former Interior Minister Habib al-Adly and six high-ranking security officers are charged with killing protesters during the 18-day uprising last January and February that ended Mubarak’s 30 year rule. Over 850 people were killed during those 18 days, and thousands were injured.
Mubarak, his sons Gamal and Alaa, and businessman Hussein Salem were also tried for corruption in a different case as part of the same proceedings.
Mubarak turned down a chance to address the court in the last session of the seven-month trial on Wednesday.
"I have no comment," Mubarak told the judge Wednesday. "What the lawyer said is enough."
His two sons, Gamal and Alaa, did not speak at the trial either, leaving their lawyer Farid al-Deeb to make a statement.
The trial, which began in August, has been choppy, with a short investigation period, brief hearings, a three-month hiatus, incomplete testimonies and a speedy ending, lawyers told AFP.
Dozens of Mubarak supporters and opponents gathered outside the courthouse on Wednesday, separated by police. Both sides chanted and held up banners. One man in the anti-Mubarak crowd held a noose to highlight calls for the once all-powerful strongman to face the death penalty.
Mubarak’s former Interior Minister, Habib al-Adly, spoke for an hour and a half, saying the uprising was the result of a foreign plot to destabilize Egypt.
Adly spoke of a “conspiracy” against Egypt, blaming foreigners for the killing of protesters in the uprising that unseated the Egyptian president.
“I reaffirm before you that there were foreign saboteurs who desecrated Egypt’s pure land and were supported by internal criminal elements with the aim of undermining Egypt’s international and regional standing and attempting to destabilize its political, security and economic stability,” he said.
He blamed Lebanese Shia group Hezbollah and Palestinian Islamist movement Hamas for sending infiltrators to Egypt, and said the plot against Egypt was continuing to this day.
Adly said the plot involved “killing peaceful protesters, storming prisons to free terrorists and criminals, vandalizing public and private properties and burning police officers inside their vehicles.”
Dozens of police officers were also killed during the uprising.
Adly defended himself and the police against the charge of murder, drawing applause from some police officers standing at the back of the courtroom.
Adly offered his condolences to the families of those killed, prompting plaintiffs’ lawyers in the room to shout, “Butcher! Execution!”
In his final statement, Ahmed Ramzy, former director of the Interior Ministry’s Central Security Forces (CSF), said that he ordered all the police officers affiliated with the CSF not to carry weapons on 28 January 2011 while dealing with protests.
He told the court that he, as a director of CSF, dealt with 970 protests before 28 January 2011, 546 of which were in Cairo, and nobody filed a complaint against the CSF.
General Adly Fayed, former deputy interior minister, said in his statement that many satellite channels sought to incite the protesters against the police.
He said that Al Jazeera, Al-Arabiya and Al-Hurra, along with other satellite channels, broadcasted videos that showed police beating the protesters.  
Fayed added that one channel accused the police of opening up prisons to cause chaos without providing any proof for these claims.
At the hearing, prosecutors told Judge Refaat that the medical wing of Cairo’s Tora Prison was ready to receive Mubarak, state television reported.
They said that Tora Prison has the necessary medical facilities to treat Mubarak and that he can be transferred to the prison hospital.
During the trail, Mubarak has been detained at the military-run International Medical Center due to his poor health condition.
Refaat said that he will look into the prosecutors’ request to transfer Mubarak to Tora Prison Hospital and will issue a decision shortly.

    You pretend to be paralyzed

    You pretend to be crazy

    Execution, execution by the law

    Roughly translated phrase on a wall on Mohammed Mahmoud Street near the American University in Cairo’s Tahrir Square campus in downtown Cairo. The author of the phrase is referring to former president Hosni Mubarak, who has been in the hospital since April 2011 (and thus for the entirety of his trial).

    Media coverage of the trial has shown an ashen-faced, ailing Mubarak lying on a stretcher in a cage in the courtroom. Below is an article from the Egypt Independent about the most recent developments in the trial of Mubarak and several former members of his regime:

     "Court to rule in Mubarak trial on 2 June, but defendants can appeal:" 

    The Mubarak trial was supposed to be a historic moment when a dictator was brought to justice by his long-suffering people, but it has been widely criticized as little more than political theater.

    The prosecution is asking for the death sentence for Mubarak, usually carried out by hanging in Egypt. Mubarak’s defense team argued that he is still president, and thus can only be tried for treason or in a special court. Mubarak can appeal the verdict if he is found guilty.

    Judge Ahmed Refaat announced Wednesday that a verdict would be delivered on 2 June.

    Former President Mubarak, former Interior Minister Habib al-Adly and six high-ranking security officers are charged with killing protesters during the 18-day uprising last January and February that ended Mubarak’s 30 year rule. Over 850 people were killed during those 18 days, and thousands were injured.

    Mubarak, his sons Gamal and Alaa, and businessman Hussein Salem were also tried for corruption in a different case as part of the same proceedings.

    Mubarak turned down a chance to address the court in the last session of the seven-month trial on Wednesday.

    "I have no comment," Mubarak told the judge Wednesday. "What the lawyer said is enough."

    His two sons, Gamal and Alaa, did not speak at the trial either, leaving their lawyer Farid al-Deeb to make a statement.

    The trial, which began in August, has been choppy, with a short investigation period, brief hearings, a three-month hiatus, incomplete testimonies and a speedy ending, lawyers told AFP.

    Dozens of Mubarak supporters and opponents gathered outside the courthouse on Wednesday, separated by police. Both sides chanted and held up banners. One man in the anti-Mubarak crowd held a noose to highlight calls for the once all-powerful strongman to face the death penalty.

    Mubarak’s former Interior Minister, Habib al-Adly, spoke for an hour and a half, saying the uprising was the result of a foreign plot to destabilize Egypt.

    Adly spoke of a “conspiracy” against Egypt, blaming foreigners for the killing of protesters in the uprising that unseated the Egyptian president.

    “I reaffirm before you that there were foreign saboteurs who desecrated Egypt’s pure land and were supported by internal criminal elements with the aim of undermining Egypt’s international and regional standing and attempting to destabilize its political, security and economic stability,” he said.

    He blamed Lebanese Shia group Hezbollah and Palestinian Islamist movement Hamas for sending infiltrators to Egypt, and said the plot against Egypt was continuing to this day.

    Adly said the plot involved “killing peaceful protesters, storming prisons to free terrorists and criminals, vandalizing public and private properties and burning police officers inside their vehicles.”

    Dozens of police officers were also killed during the uprising.

    Adly defended himself and the police against the charge of murder, drawing applause from some police officers standing at the back of the courtroom.

    Adly offered his condolences to the families of those killed, prompting plaintiffs’ lawyers in the room to shout, “Butcher! Execution!”

    In his final statement, Ahmed Ramzy, former director of the Interior Ministry’s Central Security Forces (CSF), said that he ordered all the police officers affiliated with the CSF not to carry weapons on 28 January 2011 while dealing with protests.

    He told the court that he, as a director of CSF, dealt with 970 protests before 28 January 2011, 546 of which were in Cairo, and nobody filed a complaint against the CSF.

    General Adly Fayed, former deputy interior minister, said in his statement that many satellite channels sought to incite the protesters against the police.

    He said that Al Jazeera, Al-Arabiya and Al-Hurra, along with other satellite channels, broadcasted videos that showed police beating the protesters.  

    Fayed added that one channel accused the police of opening up prisons to cause chaos without providing any proof for these claims.

    At the hearing, prosecutors told Judge Refaat that the medical wing of Cairo’s Tora Prison was ready to receive Mubarak, state television reported.

    They said that Tora Prison has the necessary medical facilities to treat Mubarak and that he can be transferred to the prison hospital.

    During the trail, Mubarak has been detained at the military-run International Medical Center due to his poor health condition.

    Refaat said that he will look into the prosecutors’ request to transfer Mubarak to Tora Prison Hospital and will issue a decision shortly.

     
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    Struggle Struggle
Resolve Resolve
Freedom Freedom 

Near the Fine Arts Institute on Taha Hussein Street in Zamalek. 

    Struggle Struggle

    Resolve Resolve

    Freedom Freedom 

    Near the Fine Arts Institute on Taha Hussein Street in Zamalek. 

     
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    Egypt Can Fly
Graffito on Taha Hussein Street in Zamalek. This is the same eagle that is on the Egyptian flag, but the artist who created the stencil replaced the phrase “Arab Republic of Egypt” with “Egypt Can Fly.”

    Egypt Can Fly

    Graffito on Taha Hussein Street in Zamalek. This is the same eagle that is on the Egyptian flag, but the artist who created the stencil replaced the phrase “Arab Republic of Egypt” with “Egypt Can Fly.”

     
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    Go down (to the street) because the martyr sees you
Graffito of Khaled Said on a wall of the Fine Arts Institute on Ismail Mohammed Street in Zamalek. It was also a call for people to protest on 25 January 2012. 
On June 13, 2010, 28-year-old Khaled Said was tortured and murdered at the hands of two policemen in Alexandria, Egypt. Apparently, the policemen had seen Said swallow a bag of drugs in an internet cafe. They subsequently arrested him and brutally beat him as they led him to a police car. A photo of Said’s horribly disfigured body was soon published on the internet, causing news of the incident to spread in Egypt and around the world. 
After seeing a photo of Said’s corpse, computer engineer and internet activist Wael Ghonim created the Facebook page “We Are All Khaled Said.” The page soon became one of Egypt’s largest dissident Facebook pages and was extremely effective in garnering support for and spreading awareness of the January 25, 2011 protest that, 18 days later, resulted in the end of the Mubarak regime. 
The description of the "We are All Khaled Said" Facebook page:
"Khaled Said, a 28-year-old Egyptian from the coastal city of Alexandria, Egypt, was tortured to death at the hands of two police officers. Several eye witnesses described how Khalid was taken by the two policemen into the entrance of a residential building where he was brutally punched and kicked. The two policemen banged his head against the wall, the staircase and the entrance steps. Despite his calls for mercy and asking them why they are doing this to him, they continued their torture until he died according to many eye witnesses.  
"Khaled has become the symbol for many Egyptians who dream to see their country free of brutality, torture and ill treatment. Many young Egyptians are now fed up with the inhuman treatment they face on a daily basis in streets, police stations and everywhere. Egyptians want to see an end to all violence committed by any Egyptian Policeman. Egyptians are aspiring to the day when Egypt has its freedom and dignity back, the day when the current 30 years long emergency martial law ends and when Egyptians can freely elect their true representatives."
And Issandr El Amrani of Arabist.net’s comments on Khaled Said’s murder from 14 June 2010 (which are quite interesting to read in light of events of the ongoing uprising in Egypt):
"Unfortunately such [incidents] are routine, what is rarer is that we hear about them. Human rights groups have long been saying that torture is systematic and endemic in Egypt, this is what this means in practice. It also points to the criminalization of the police — not only is the Ministry of Interior coming out in full force to protect its own, but the officers in question appear to be involved in drug dealing. What this shows is that Egypt is continuing its slide from authoritarian state to mafia state, where the authorities don’t even have to answer to institutions anymore.
"The Nadeem Center is probably right: the only way to reverse this trend is to start by sacking Habib al-Adly, the improbably long-lived Interior Minister in place since 1997 (perhaps the longest-serving interior minister in the last 50 years, at least.) Al-Adly has been impervious to numerous torture scandals, to the deterioration of police work under his reign, to his handling of terrorist incidents in Sinai between 2004 and 2006, and much more. What can you say of a minister under whose tutelage abuses have worsened and the perception that police is run by criminal elements — notably drug barons — has proliferated? He should be sacked and his senior officers purged and investigated.
"There is a lesson here for external powers too. Several embassies run police training programs and have other form of collaboration with the Ministry of Interior. How can you take these seriously under this type of leadership?"

    Go down (to the street) because the martyr sees you

    Graffito of Khaled Said on a wall of the Fine Arts Institute on Ismail Mohammed Street in Zamalek. It was also a call for people to protest on 25 January 2012. 

    On June 13, 2010, 28-year-old Khaled Said was tortured and murdered at the hands of two policemen in Alexandria, Egypt. Apparently, the policemen had seen Said swallow a bag of drugs in an internet cafe. They subsequently arrested him and brutally beat him as they led him to a police car. A photo of Said’s horribly disfigured body was soon published on the internet, causing news of the incident to spread in Egypt and around the world. 

    After seeing a photo of Said’s corpse, computer engineer and internet activist Wael Ghonim created the Facebook page “We Are All Khaled Said.” The page soon became one of Egypt’s largest dissident Facebook pages and was extremely effective in garnering support for and spreading awareness of the January 25, 2011 protest that, 18 days later, resulted in the end of the Mubarak regime. 

    The description of the "We are All Khaled Said" Facebook page:

    "Khaled Said, a 28-year-old Egyptian from the coastal city of Alexandria, Egypt, was tortured to death at the hands of two police officers. Several eye witnesses described how Khalid was taken by the two policemen into the entrance of a residential building where he was brutally punched and kicked. The two policemen banged his head against the wall, the staircase and the entrance steps. Despite his calls for mercy and asking them why they are doing this to him, they continued their torture until he died according to many eye witnesses. 
     

    "Khaled has become the symbol for many Egyptians who dream to see their country free of brutality, torture and ill treatment. Many young Egyptians are now fed up with the inhuman treatment they face on a daily basis in streets, police stations and everywhere. Egyptians want to see an end to all violence committed by any Egyptian Policeman. Egyptians are aspiring to the day when Egypt has its freedom and dignity back, the day when the current 30 years long emergency martial law ends and when Egyptians can freely elect their true representatives."

    And Issandr El Amrani of Arabist.net’s comments on Khaled Said’s murder from 14 June 2010 (which are quite interesting to read in light of events of the ongoing uprising in Egypt):

    "Unfortunately such [incidents] are routine, what is rarer is that we hear about them. Human rights groups have long been saying that torture is systematic and endemic in Egypt, this is what this means in practice. It also points to the criminalization of the police — not only is the Ministry of Interior coming out in full force to protect its own, but the officers in question appear to be involved in drug dealing. What this shows is that Egypt is continuing its slide from authoritarian state to mafia state, where the authorities don’t even have to answer to institutions anymore.

    "The Nadeem Center is probably right: the only way to reverse this trend is to start by sacking Habib al-Adly, the improbably long-lived Interior Minister in place since 1997 (perhaps the longest-serving interior minister in the last 50 years, at least.) Al-Adly has been impervious to numerous torture scandals, to the deterioration of police work under his reign, to his handling of terrorist incidents in Sinai between 2004 and 2006, and much more. What can you say of a minister under whose tutelage abuses have worsened and the perception that police is run by criminal elements — notably drug barons — has proliferated? He should be sacked and his senior officers purged and investigated.

    "There is a lesson here for external powers too. Several embassies run police training programs and have other form of collaboration with the Ministry of Interior. How can you take these seriously under this type of leadership?"

     
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    Who entrusts does not die
Graffito by Arafa on the wall encircling the American University in Cairo’s downtown campus on Mohammed Mahmoud Street. The phrase that the artist has included is a play on a saying “اللي حلف مامتش” which means, roughly, “who reproduces/has a child does not die.”
On February 11, 2011, former president Hosni Mubarak stepped down and governing Egypt and protecting the revolution was entrusted to the Supreme Council of Armed Forces (SCAF) and Field Marshal Mohammed Hussein Tantawi. Yet now a year since the uprising in Egypt began, many Egyptians complain that the SCAF has only prevented steps towards ‘true’ democracy and thus is leading a counterrevolution. As this artist suggests through the phrase he has written and the half- Mubarak half-Tantawi face he has painted, the former regime remains. 

    Who entrusts does not die

    Graffito by Arafa on the wall encircling the American University in Cairo’s downtown campus on Mohammed Mahmoud Street. The phrase that the artist has included is a play on a saying “اللي حلف مامتش” which means, roughly, “who reproduces/has a child does not die.”

    On February 11, 2011, former president Hosni Mubarak stepped down and governing Egypt and protecting the revolution was entrusted to the Supreme Council of Armed Forces (SCAF) and Field Marshal Mohammed Hussein Tantawi. Yet now a year since the uprising in Egypt began, many Egyptians complain that the SCAF has only prevented steps towards ‘true’ democracy and thus is leading a counterrevolution. As this artist suggests through the phrase he has written and the half- Mubarak half-Tantawi face he has painted, the former regime remains. 

     
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    أروح فين؟ Where do I go?
الشعب The People 
الحكومة The Government
الثورة The Revolution
أجندة خارجية Foreign Agenda

Graffito on Taha Hussein Street near the Fine Arts Institute in Zamalek. The mouse in the drawing is at a crossroads in the midst of the ongoing uprising in Egypt and is unsure of what he should do and what he should believe. Should he continue protesting? Should he listen to the government? Are there invisible, foreign elements working to destabilize Egypt? 

    أروح فين؟ Where do I go?

    الشعب The People 

    الحكومة The Government

    الثورة The Revolution

    أجندة خارجية Foreign Agenda

    Graffito on Taha Hussein Street near the Fine Arts Institute in Zamalek. The mouse in the drawing is at a crossroads in the midst of the ongoing uprising in Egypt and is unsure of what he should do and what he should believe. Should he continue protesting? Should he listen to the government? Are there invisible, foreign elements working to destabilize Egypt? 

     
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    Freedom does not die
On the wall of the Fine Arts Institute in Zamalek on Ismail Mohammed Street

    Freedom does not die

    On the wall of the Fine Arts Institute in Zamalek on Ismail Mohammed Street