1. 19:54 12th Dec 2012

    Notes: 6

    Reblogged from whereisthebread

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    whereisthebread:


On Qasr Al-Nil Street in downtown Cairo // في شارع قصر النيل في وسط البلد
If you try, you can!
This graffito refers to the silent majority of Egyptians, “Hizb al-Kanaba” (“The Couch Party); ”It seemed that almost the entire country was couch-ridden until only two years ago, but this revolution has brought “Couch Party” members off of their cushions and onto the the city’s streets. It is their participation in the protests against President Mohamed Morsy’s most recent constitutional declaration that has been most visible, as their lifestyles threatened, they come out in droves.”
Continue reading the rest of this article from Egypt Independent

    whereisthebread:

    On Qasr Al-Nil Street in downtown Cairo // في شارع قصر النيل في وسط البلد

    If you try, you can!


    This graffito refers to the silent majority of Egyptians, “Hizb al-Kanaba” (“The Couch Party); ”It seemed that almost the entire country was couch-ridden until only two years ago, but this revolution has brought “Couch Party” members off of their cushions and onto the the city’s streets. It is their participation in the protests against President Mohamed Morsy’s most recent constitutional declaration that has been most visible, as their lifestyles threatened, they come out in droves.”

    Continue reading the rest of this article from Egypt Independent

     
  2. 21:41 10th Dec 2012

    Notes: 15

    Reblogged from whereisthebread

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    whereisthebread:

At the Presidential Palace in Heliopolis // في قصر الاتحادية في مصر الجديدة
Mor-sula!
(Mohammed Morsi as an octopus)

    whereisthebread:

    At the Presidential Palace in Heliopolis // في قصر الاتحادية في مصر الجديدة

    Mor-sula!

    (Mohammed Morsi as an octopus)

     
  3. 21:30

    Reblogged from whereisthebread

    whereisthebread:

    On Tahrir Street in Dokki // شارع تحرير في الدقي

    If what is due to our brothers is not achieved, we are not to blame - 6th of April

    The 6th of April Movement is a movement started by young activists in 2008 in the industrial town of El-Mahallah El-Kubra to support workers who planned to go on strike on April 6th. It played an important role in the January 25th uprising and has continued to do so throughout the continuing revolution. 

    This graffito is a comment on the current situation in Egypt. It seems to many that the revolution has been stolen, which would mean that the martyrs died in vain. 

     
  4. 00:37

    Notes: 3

    Reblogged from whereisthebread

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    whereisthebread:

Near the Presidential Palace in Heliopolis // قريب من قصر الاتحادية في مصر الجديدة
Leave!
Sticker near the Presidential Palace. Some of those who oppose Morsi have started to chant “irhal!” (“leave!”) in protests throughout the past two weeks. They believe that after Morsi’s declaration, he and the Muslim Brotherhood have lost all legitimacy and therefore they demand the fall of the regime. This chant was famous in the protests of the 18 day uprising that toppled Mubarak.  
Yet Morsi was democratically elected and not all of the opposition necessarily want the fall of the regime. It is more important, they think, that he rescind his Constitutional decree and allow for dialogue and cooperation between all segments of Egyptian society, especially with regards to the constitution. 

    whereisthebread:

    Near the Presidential Palace in Heliopolis // قريب من قصر الاتحادية في مصر الجديدة

    Leave!


    Sticker near the Presidential Palace. Some of those who oppose Morsi have started to chant “irhal!” (“leave!”) in protests throughout the past two weeks. They believe that after Morsi’s declaration, he and the Muslim Brotherhood have lost all legitimacy and therefore they demand the fall of the regime. This chant was famous in the protests of the 18 day uprising that toppled Mubarak.  

    Yet Morsi was democratically elected and not all of the opposition necessarily want the fall of the regime. It is more important, they think, that he rescind his Constitutional decree and allow for dialogue and cooperation between all segments of Egyptian society, especially with regards to the constitution. 

     
  5. 17:26 9th Dec 2012

    Notes: 8

    Reblogged from whereisthebread

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    whereisthebread:

At the Presidential Palace // في قصر الاتحادية
Who entrusts still doesn’t die
A mural by the Artists of the Revolution Association, inspired by one that was on Mohammed Mahmoud Street in February 2012. The original saying is اللي حلف ما ماتش, which means roughly “who gives birth/has children doesn’t die/lives on. The faces here are those of Mubarak, former head of the Supreme Council of Armed Forces, Tantawi, and Morsi. 
It suggests that the period under the Supreme Council of Armed Forces and now Morsi’s presidency are the same the Mubarak regime. 

    whereisthebread:

    At the Presidential Palace // في قصر الاتحادية

    Who entrusts still doesn’t die

    A mural by the Artists of the Revolution Association, inspired by one that was on Mohammed Mahmoud Street in February 2012. The original saying is اللي حلف ما ماتش, which means roughly “who gives birth/has children doesn’t die/lives on. The faces here are those of Mubarak, former head of the Supreme Council of Armed Forces, Tantawi, and Morsi. 

    It suggests that the period under the Supreme Council of Armed Forces and now Morsi’s presidency are the same the Mubarak regime. 

     
  6. 23:51 8th Dec 2012

    Notes: 2

    Reblogged from whereisthebread

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    whereisthebread:

cairoFacing the Presidential Palace// قريب من قصر الاتحادية
Freedom
Where is what is due (“the right”) of the martyrs??
Recent mural across from the Presidential Palace, the site of recent clashes between “the opposition” and supporters of Morsi and his decree. This mural reminds us of the hundreds of people died who died protesting throughout the continuing uprising, especially in the wake of Morsi having assumed almost dictator-like powers. 

    whereisthebread:

    cairoFacing the Presidential Palace// قريب من قصر الاتحادية

    Freedom

    Where is what is due (“the right”) of the martyrs??

    Recent mural across from the Presidential Palace, the site of recent clashes between “the opposition” and supporters of Morsi and his decree. This mural reminds us of the hundreds of people died who died protesting throughout the continuing uprising, especially in the wake of Morsi having assumed almost dictator-like powers. 

     
  7. 12:30

    Notes: 290

    Reblogged from whereisthebread

    whereisthebread:

Near the Presidential Palace on Al-Merghani Street // قريب من قصر الاتحادية في شارع الميرغني
We are all human beings
Graffito of three women, one wearing a niqab, one a hijab, and the other unveiled. The current political crisis in Egypt has divided Egyptian society into those who support President Morsi’s declaration, and those who are against it. Both adamantly believe they are the promoters and protectors of the January 25th Revolution and have started to view the other with contempt. This graffito reminds us that we are all human beings and that each side has hopes for social justice and dignity. 

    whereisthebread:

    Near the Presidential Palace on Al-Merghani Street // قريب من قصر الاتحادية في شارع الميرغني

    We are all human beings

    Graffito of three women, one wearing a niqab, one a hijab, and the other unveiled. The current political crisis in Egypt has divided Egyptian society into those who support President Morsi’s declaration, and those who are against it. Both adamantly believe they are the promoters and protectors of the January 25th Revolution and have started to view the other with contempt. This graffito reminds us that we are all human beings and that each side has hopes for social justice and dignity. 

     
  8. NEW BLOG. And thank you.

    Dear followers,

    I have started a new blog "Where is the Bread?" "فين العيش؟"  about graffiti in Egypt after Mohammed Mursy’s election that demand the fulfillment of the goals of the revolution. It is in both Arabic and English. 

    Thank you for your wonderful support this past year. 

    To a free and democratic Egypt!

    Claire

     
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    The meaning of life is that you give life meaning
Graffito by Keizer on the wall of the Shabab club in Zamalek. I believe it is a tribute to those who died in the Port Said football stadium violence on February 1.  

    The meaning of life is that you give life meaning

    Graffito by Keizer on the wall of the Shabab club in Zamalek. I believe it is a tribute to those who died in the Port Said football stadium violence on February 1.  

     
  10. image: Download

    Tank by Ganzeer and Tahrir sign by Nazeer under the 6th of October bridge in Zamalek. I’m not sure who painted the army general (who has unfortunately been defaced). 
This is what the wall looked like about a year ago. 

    Tank by Ganzeer and Tahrir sign by Nazeer under the 6th of October bridge in Zamalek. I’m not sure who painted the army general (who has unfortunately been defaced). 

    This is what the wall looked like about a year ago.