1. 00:15 28th Jan 2013

    Notes: 14

    Reblogged from whereisthebread

    Check out Where is the Bread

    whereisthebread:

    In Midan Falaki // في ميدان الفلكي

    Mustafa Essam

    Retribution or Chaos

    Mustafa Essam was one of 74 killed in the Port Said stadium massacre last February, which erupted after a football match between the Al Masry Club and the visiting Al Ahly Club from Cairo. The graffiti in the second photo says “Port Said Verdict 1/26,” sprayed by the Ultras Ahlawy on a concrete block in my neighborhood two weeks ago. The third and fourth are some of the faces of other martyrs of the massacre. 

    After the match between Al-Ahly and Al-Masry Clubs on February 2, 2011, angry Al Masry Club football fans stormed the football field and attacked rival Ahly fans with stones, knives, bottles, and fireworks, and other crude weapons. Some died from stab wounds and clubbing, while others were killed in the stampede or after having been deliberately thrown from the stadium stands.  

    Allegedly, the violence, initially sparked by a conflict between the two teams in a different city the week before the massacre, was organized by the Ministry of Interior/security apparatus to distract Egyptians from political problems in the country, instill fear of instability, and justify restrictive security measures such as the Emergency Law - a tactic that has been used by the regime for decades. People have cited security irregularities as evidence in activists’ allegations that the violence was organized. The usual security searches were not conducted prior to the match, allowing weapons to be brought into the stadium. Additionally, the gates to the stadium were strangely locked during the massacre, trapping the Al Ahly fans in. 

    In anticipation of the court ruling on the defendants in the Port Said massacre murder case, the Ultras Ahlawy called for protests in the weeks leading up to the 26th of January and warned that there would be blood if retribution was not achieved. A few days before the 26th, it was announced that the ruling on the case would be postponed since new evidence had been found that required further investigation.

    Yet on the morning of the 26th, the court issued death sentences to 21 of 70+ defendants in the case. Of those who have been sentenced to death by hanging, none are members of the police/security apparatus/Ministry of Interior - even though security forces have been accused of being complicit in the massacre. Those who do face death are mostly young football fans, mere pawns of the political maneuverings of the Ministry of Interior and the government. Despite their involvement in the violence, these young people, just like the Ultras Ahlawy and many other young Egyptians, have been the victims of police brutality for decades. Not only have they been humiliated at the hands of the police - the murders of Khaled Said and Sayed Bilal are an example of this - but many have been denied basic aspects of human dignity and have suffered from unemployment, poverty, and an oppressive regime. These were factors that brought many of the youth to the streets on January 25, 2011 and throughout the continuing revolution in Egypt. 

    The violence that has erupted in Egypt and the number of people who have died in the past few days is shocking. Although many of the Ultras Ahlawy have celebrated the verdict, it is heartbreaking that those who are being punished for the violence in Port Said are young Egyptians, many of whom, it can be argued, don’t have much agency.

    It is equally saddening that in the two years since the revolution began, these young people are of the first to be punished. Former President Mubarak and others who previously occupied high positions in the government and are responsible for the deaths of protesters, corruption, and many of the problems in the country, are either still awaiting verdicts that have been postponed numerous times, or have avoided trial. 

    The Ultras threatened retribution or chaos - what we’re seeing is both. 

     
  2. Reminder, new blog!

    Dear followers, just a reminder that I’ve started a new blog and am no longer posting on Uprisings in Translation. Please check out: Where is the bread? فين العيش؟

    Thanks again for your support!!

     
  3. 08:14 28th Dec 2012

    Notes: 32

    Reblogged from whereisthebread

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    whereisthebread:

In Midan Falaki // في ميدان الفلكي
No to harassment 

    whereisthebread:

    In Midan Falaki // في ميدان الفلكي

    No to harassment 

     
  4. 03:24 27th Dec 2012

    Notes: 4

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Youssef el-Gundi Street, downtown Cairo // شارع يوسف الجندي, وسط البلد
Egyptian Constitution 
Not contrary to God’s law
I found this graffito of a constitution with a Salafi beard and an army/police cap before Morsi’s constitutional declaration on November 22. It’s a sarcastic remark on some Islamists’ desire to make sharia law the basis of the Egyptian constitution (which Mohammed Morsi signed into law yesterday).
While being sworn into (the now dissolved) Parliament last year, several newly elected Islamist members added “not contrary to God’s law” to the end of the oath of office, something that many Egyptians were taken aback by. 

    whereisthebread:

    Youssef el-Gundi Street, downtown Cairo // شارع يوسف الجندي, وسط البلد

    Egyptian Constitution 

    Not contrary to God’s law

    I found this graffito of a constitution with a Salafi beard and an army/police cap before Morsi’s constitutional declaration on November 22. It’s a sarcastic remark on some Islamists’ desire to make sharia law the basis of the Egyptian constitution (which Mohammed Morsi signed into law yesterday).

    While being sworn into (the now dissolved) Parliament last year, several newly elected Islamist members added “not contrary to God’s law” to the end of the oath of office, something that many Egyptians were taken aback by. 

     
  5. 22:21 26th Dec 2012

    Notes: 4

    Reblogged from whereisthebread

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Near Suleiman Gohar Street in Dokki // قريب من شارع سليمان جوهر بالدقي
Amr Moussa
“I am the president of the feloul”
I suspect that this graffito dates back to the presidential elections in May/June in which Amr Moussa, pictured here, was one of the frontrunners. Although his extensive experience in politics and as the secretary-general of the Arab League made many suspect that he’d do well in the elections, accusations that he had ties to the former regime (“feloul”) delegitimized him the eyes of many voters.
In the constitutional crisis, Moussa and other presidential candidates such as Mohammed Baradei and Hamdeen Sabahi united to form the National Salvation Front (NSF) to defeat President Morsi’s November 22nd decree. Although the NSF/opposition includes liberals and those who were very critical of former regime members running for political office, the coalition has been accused by the Muslim Brotherhood and its supporters of being remnants of the  Mubarak regime and of leading a counterrevolution. 

    whereisthebread:

    Near Suleiman Gohar Street in Dokki // قريب من شارع سليمان جوهر بالدقي

    Amr Moussa

    “I am the president of the feloul”

    I suspect that this graffito dates back to the presidential elections in May/June in which Amr Moussa, pictured here, was one of the frontrunners. Although his extensive experience in politics and as the secretary-general of the Arab League made many suspect that he’d do well in the elections, accusations that he had ties to the former regime (“feloul”) delegitimized him the eyes of many voters.

    In the constitutional crisis, Moussa and other presidential candidates such as Mohammed Baradei and Hamdeen Sabahi united to form the National Salvation Front (NSF) to defeat President Morsi’s November 22nd decree. Although the NSF/opposition includes liberals and those who were very critical of former regime members running for political office, the coalition has been accused by the Muslim Brotherhood and its supporters of being remnants of the  Mubarak regime and of leading a counterrevolution. 

     
  6. 00:23 23rd Dec 2012

    Notes: 3

    Reblogged from whereisthebread

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Talaat Harb Square, downtown Cairo // ميدان طلعت حرب وسط البلد
Your constitution does not represent us
6 of April Youth Movement 
The 6th of April Movement is a movement started by young activists in 2008 in the industrial town of El-Mahallah El-Kubra to support workers who planned to go on strike on April 6th. It played an important role in the January 25th uprising and has continued to do so throughout the continuing revolution. 
The “does not” in this translation also means “no” in Arabic (the red “لا” in the graffito), the main symbol/word used by those who are against the passing of the constitution. Today is the second day of voting in the referendum on the constitution (the first day was a week ago, December 15). 

    whereisthebread:

    Talaat Harb Square, downtown Cairo // ميدان طلعت حرب وسط البلد

    Your constitution does not represent us

    6 of April Youth Movement 

    The 6th of April Movement is a movement started by young activists in 2008 in the industrial town of El-Mahallah El-Kubra to support workers who planned to go on strike on April 6th. It played an important role in the January 25th uprising and has continued to do so throughout the continuing revolution. 

    The “does not” in this translation also means “no” in Arabic (the red “لا” in the graffito), the main symbol/word used by those who are against the passing of the constitution. Today is the second day of voting in the referendum on the constitution (the first day was a week ago, December 15). 

     
  7. 17:26 21st Dec 2012

    Notes: 8

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On Mohammed Mahmoud Street // في شارع محمد محمود 
The Quran, Sura Al-Baqara
204. ” And among people is he whose speech in the life of this world causes you to wonder, and he calls on Allah to witness as to what is in his heart, yet he is the most violent of adversaries.”205. ” And when he turns back, he strives to cause mischief on the earth, and to destroy the tilth and the stock. But Allah does not love mischief.”206. ” And when it is said to him, ’ Fear Allah ‘, pride drives him towards sin. So Hell shall be sufficient for him and it is an evil abode indeed.”
Interpretation from Rafed.net:
 ”There are some people who, with their smooth tongue, express Faith and indulge in plausible talk with many oaths. But, the same persons are the most harmful enemies and hostile ones against Islam; and, hiddenly they stir up quarrels and cause all sorts of mischief: they spoil the crops of the farms, strive to waste and defame the believing men and the religion of the Truth.
“God uncovers their tricks and makes their interiors manifest for His Messenger that they try in the path of making mischief. If they were true in their statements, they would not cast mischief and destruction, because everybody knows that God does not love mischief. 
“The commentary of this verse is such: ’ when the hypocrites take the government in their control, they begin making mischief and destruction and stretching oppression and transgression amongst people. Then as the result of the spread of oppression and cruelty, the cities and societies turn to ruin and the lives and properties of people will be in danger. These wicked people are so that when they are prohibited from doing disgrace, their fanaticism and obstinacy will be excited, then, they not only do not hearken to the advices of the benevolent advisers but, with their own specific pride, increase their wickedness and evil actions.”

After speaking with friends about this mural and the interpretation of these verses, I’ve learned that this is meant to be a message to the Muslim Brotherhood regarding its policies and actions since coming to power in Egypt - and most recently Mohammed Morsi’s constitutional decree and subsequent decisions regarding the constitution and referendum. 

    whereisthebread:

    On Mohammed Mahmoud Street // في شارع محمد محمود 

    The Quran, Sura Al-Baqara

    204. ” And among people is he whose speech in the life of this world causes you to wonder, and he calls on Allah to witness as to what is in his heart, yet he is the most violent of adversaries.”

    205. ” And when he turns back, he strives to cause mischief on the earth, and to destroy the tilth and the stock. But Allah does not love mischief.”

    206. ” And when it is said to him, ’ Fear Allah ‘, pride drives him towards sin. So Hell shall be sufficient for him and it is an evil abode indeed.”


    Interpretation from Rafed.net:

     ”There are some people who, with their smooth tongue, express Faith and indulge in plausible talk with many oaths. But, the same persons are the most harmful enemies and hostile ones against Islam; and, hiddenly they stir up quarrels and cause all sorts of mischief: they spoil the crops of the farms, strive to waste and defame the believing men and the religion of the Truth.

    “God uncovers their tricks and makes their interiors manifest for His Messenger that they try in the path of making mischief. If they were true in their statements, they would not cast mischief and destruction, because everybody knows that God does not love mischief. 

    “The commentary of this verse is such: ’ when the hypocrites take the government in their control, they begin making mischief and destruction and stretching oppression and transgression amongst people. Then as the result of the spread of oppression and cruelty, the cities and societies turn to ruin and the lives and properties of people will be in danger. These wicked people are so that when they are prohibited from doing disgrace, their fanaticism and obstinacy will be excited, then, they not only do not hearken to the advices of the benevolent advisers but, with their own specific pride, increase their wickedness and evil actions.”


    After speaking with friends about this mural and the interpretation of these verses, I’ve learned that this is meant to be a message to the Muslim Brotherhood regarding its policies and actions since coming to power in Egypt - and most recently Mohammed Morsi’s constitutional decree and subsequent decisions regarding the constitution and referendum. 

     
  8. 09:19 15th Dec 2012

    Notes: 10

    Reblogged from whereisthebread

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    whereisthebread:

At the Presidential Palace in Heliopolis // قصر الاتحادية في مصر الجديدة
Open the doors of silence and scream! 
Mural of Gaber Salah “Geka”, the 16-year-old activist who was shot at close range in downtown Cairo while protesting on Mohammed Mahmoud Street days before Morsi’s constitutional decree. He died a few days later, and his funeral procession was in Tahrir Square.  There are several different stencils and murals of Gika in and around Tahrir Square, the Presidential Palace in Heliopolis, and other neighborhoods of Cairo. 

    whereisthebread:

    At the Presidential Palace in Heliopolis // قصر الاتحادية في مصر الجديدة

    Open the doors of silence and scream! 


    Mural of Gaber Salah “Geka”, the 16-year-old activist who was shot at close range in downtown Cairo while protesting on Mohammed Mahmoud Street days before Morsi’s constitutional decree. He died a few days later, and his funeral procession was in Tahrir Square.  There are several different stencils and murals of Gika in and around Tahrir Square, the Presidential Palace in Heliopolis, and other neighborhoods of Cairo. 

     
  9. 12:29 14th Dec 2012

    Notes: 3

    Reblogged from whereisthebread

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    whereisthebread:

Near the Presidential Palace in Heliopolis // قريب من قصر الاتحادية في مصر الجديدة
NO to the Brotherhood’s constitution
The Brotherhood are liars
Tomorrow is the first day of voting in the referendum on the highly controversial constitution (the second round will be on December 22nd). Members of the multi-faceted opposition - a last-minute coalition of liberal and secular parties now called the National Salvation Front - have planned a comprehensive campaign to educate voters about the constitution and its worrying aspects and to encourage people to vote “no.”
They are at a disadvantage, however, as the Muslim Brotherhood has a significant support base, organized networks, and have been campaigning in favor of the constitution for quite some time. 

    whereisthebread:

    Near the Presidential Palace in Heliopolis // قريب من قصر الاتحادية في مصر الجديدة

    NO to the Brotherhood’s constitution

    The Brotherhood are liars

    Tomorrow is the first day of voting in the referendum on the highly controversial constitution (the second round will be on December 22nd). Members of the multi-faceted opposition - a last-minute coalition of liberal and secular parties now called the National Salvation Front - have planned a comprehensive campaign to educate voters about the constitution and its worrying aspects and to encourage people to vote “no.”

    They are at a disadvantage, however, as the Muslim Brotherhood has a significant support base, organized networks, and have been campaigning in favor of the constitution for quite some time. 

     
  10. 09:17 13th Dec 2012

    Notes: 7

    Reblogged from whereisthebread

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    whereisthebread:

In Mounira, close to the Interior Ministry // قريب من الوزارة الداخلية في منيرة
Khaled Said
Two years and your rights/what is due still has not been achieved
On June 13, 2010, 28-year-old Khaled Said was tortured and murdered at the hands of two policemen in Alexandria, Egypt. The policemen claimed they had seen Said swallow a bag of drugs in an internet cafe so arrested Said and brutally beat him as they led him to a police car. A photo of Said’s horribly disfigured body was soon published on the internet, causing news of the incident to spread in Egypt and around the world. 
After seeing a photo of Said’s corpse, computer engineer and internet activist Wael Ghonim created the Facebook page “We Are All Khaled Said.” The page soon became one of Egypt’s largest dissident Facebook pages and was extremely effective in garnering support for and spreading awareness of the January 25, 2011 protest that, 18 days later, resulted in the end of the Mubarak regime. 
Two years after Said’s deaths, as well as the deaths of protesters throughout the continuing revolution, families and Egyptians are still grieving for their loved ones who died in order to achieve freedom and social justice. The martyrs’ right to financial compensation has been neglected by successful governments. The families of those who died want social justice, and that the killers of the demonstrators be swiftly punished. 

    whereisthebread:

    In Mounira, close to the Interior Ministry // قريب من الوزارة الداخلية في منيرة

    Khaled Said

    Two years and your rights/what is due still has not been achieved

    On June 13, 2010, 28-year-old Khaled Said was tortured and murdered at the hands of two policemen in Alexandria, Egypt. The policemen claimed they had seen Said swallow a bag of drugs in an internet cafe so arrested Said and brutally beat him as they led him to a police car. A photo of Said’s horribly disfigured body was soon published on the internet, causing news of the incident to spread in Egypt and around the world. 

    After seeing a photo of Said’s corpse, computer engineer and internet activist Wael Ghonim created the Facebook page “We Are All Khaled Said.” The page soon became one of Egypt’s largest dissident Facebook pages and was extremely effective in garnering support for and spreading awareness of the January 25, 2011 protest that, 18 days later, resulted in the end of the Mubarak regime. 

    Two years after Said’s deaths, as well as the deaths of protesters throughout the continuing revolution, families and Egyptians are still grieving for their loved ones who died in order to achieve freedom and social justice. The martyrs’ right to financial compensation has been neglected by successful governments. The families of those who died want social justice, and that the killers of the demonstrators be swiftly punished.